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Interview with Lomography


For Lomography, 2016.

Interview with Lomography


For Lomography, 2016.

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"Finland based UK photographer Adam Eronen Piper shoots beautiful, minimal shots that evoke a sense of calm. We lent him the Jupiter 3+ lens which he used with a roll of colour film and his trusty Leica camera."

 

 

Tell us a bit about yourself?

"Based in Finland, I used to teach photography to university students in the UK but I followed my wife back to her homeland earlier this year. I’m a bit of an oddity photographically speaking, I have stuff that I definitely don’t shoot but apart from those I do a lot of different stuff. I like trying to capture the flavour of places and I’m quite in to textures, wood, metals, concrete, stone, those kind of raw materials. I also love the descriptive element of picture making, particularly when curating my work. It’s a nice achievement when a single image can encapsulate an entire story but sometimes it’s nice when images can’t speak for themselves unless they are contextualised within a body of work. They need to be read like a book, each scene is its own chapter, and that’s what I enjoy most about photography; the curiosity and the story."
 

How did you get on shooting with the lens?

"I’ve shot Jupiter lenses before, some of the originals, but the 3 is the flagship and I can see why you chose it. It deserved to be reborn. My Jupiter 8 is a bit of a mess, covered in oil, oxidisation and is a little shaky. By comparison the review copy of the Jupiter 3+ was a pleasure to hold, silky smooth and incredibly handsome as lenses go. There is so much glass I could stare at it for days. Since the lens comes with an M mount adapter I decided to mount it on to my M6 and shoot some of my regular film. In operation it is very different to my Konica M lenses. The focus throw is much longer and the aperture ring doesn’t have stops. Both add accuracy in my opinion as the focus ring allows you to make smaller adjustments and the aperture ring allows for an infinite amount of diaphragm increments between traditional f-stops.
The lens isn’t without its quirks though. The aperture rings increments are all bunched up at one end and spread out at the other which will take time getting used to. Wide open it’s a little inconsistent as vignetting, soft edges and messy bokeh start to dominate the image but stopped down a few and all that melts away into a very characterful and surprisingly contrasty image maker. With the types of images I was choosing to make I could talk about colour aberration, sharpness and barrel distortion all day but that would be missing the point. All of the above are what give the Jupiter lenses their character and the whole point of bringing them back. All of these are traits of the original so it’s an enjoyably authentic experience and I’m super happy with my results."
 

What did you choose to shoot?

"It was tempting to shoot something special or unusual with this review but I made a conscious effort just to stick it on my camera like I would any other lens and shoot what I usually do. At the moment I’m currently exploring my new surroundings, building up a collage of the city and the things that make it unique, looking for the flavour of the place. Most of what I chose to shoot involved architectural alignments. The ones where you slowly walk around your subject and suddenly everything clicks into place like a stereotypical TV advert. During my exploration I stumbled across an old train yard. Inside the shed was an dormant steam train hibernating seemingly for quite a while. Perfect task for the massive light gathering capability of the Jupiter 3+ and it definitely got me shots I couldn’t have captured without it. I shot 3 films worth over 3 weeks in all types of light from direct sun to ill lit interiors so I can safely say I put it to the test, all be it unintentionally."
 

What’s coming up in 2016?

"Finland is my 2016. Everything I’ve done so far has been in an effort to get where I am now and it’s beginning to fall into place. You can expect a lot of new work appearing soon as I settle in. My online portfolio will be regularly evolving as I publish new work and that will be reflected in my Instagram and Flickr accounts. I’m also in the middle of a YouTube revival, putting the character and enjoyment back in to my videos after a long time off. I want to turn it into something that reflects the effort I have put into the rest of my practice as it was always more of a casual interest before."
 
 

Source:

lomography.com

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Inspiring Inovation with ONDU


ONDU Pinhole Cameras, 2015.

Inspiring Inovation with ONDU


ONDU Pinhole Cameras, 2015.

ONDU pinhole cameras are one of the simplest and most beautiful, sustainably built photographic projects in recent years. After shooting a little with their multi-format 6x12 camera, I decided to make a few modifications to my own, one of which caught the eye of Elvis Halilović, founder of ONDU. The modifications included a shutter stop crafted from a shortened and folded pin pushed through the wooden body of the camera. Inspired by these modifications Elvis kickstarted the MKII version of his successful pinhole range to include, among other feedback inspired changes, the new shutter stop feature.
 

 

Elvis, founder of ONDU Pinhole Cameras, says:

"One of the most important changes was done to the shutter. The change was inspired by our friend Adam Eronen Piper that modified his ONDU 6x12 to include a stop pin that stops the shutter while closing. The resulting pictures were absolute proof that a stop pin was necessary..."

Below you can see the original modified ONDU Multiformat 6x12 (left) next to the MKII version (right) featuring Elvis' reengineer shutter stop inspired by the modification.

 
 

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Interview with Lumu


For Lumu Light Meter, 2015.

Interview with Lumu


For Lumu Light Meter, 2015.

Short personal intro.

"I’m a photographic artist. I’m not sure if I fit into any box, but I know which boxes I don’t fit into. I like to find curiosities, naturally occurring still lives, and attempt to give the unremarkable a little attention. Sometimes I imagine myself as a pioneering explorer completely stuck in the dark, not knowing which direction to go, only knowing that I have to keep pushing forward somewhere new. Caveman with a camera if you will."

 

Your personal story with photography.

"I shot my first film on a family holiday in Wales when I was 16. My Dad bought me a camera for my birthday and I had absolutely no interest in it at the time. I enjoyed drawing and making things by hand but I didn’t see the value in capturing something outside of my imagination. I shot it anyway. Developed it at a lab when I got home and I was hooked immediately. I’d never felt like I could express my understanding of the world around me with more clarity. It was like finally cracking a good recipe for dinner and sharing it with your friends. 5 years of study and many cameras later, my life now revolves around photography."

 

What do you want to achieve?

"I wanted to develop my own style from the start. I didn’t want to just photocopy my favourite images. I wanted to take all the things I loved about their images and remaster them like a crazy remix you downloaded of that indie band you used to love."

 

Where do you think the wisdom and instinct for good photograph comes from?

"Good photography comes from being able to see things everyone else forgot to see. I always take the challenge of travelling to a visually desolate area and finding the photo, because there is always a photo hiding somewhere. Having an imagination for how things arrived to being is also a big part of it. How did that chair end up upside down with only 3 legs left? Maybe there is a photographic narrative to be created."

 

The craziest thing you ever did as a photographer?

"Standing in 4 foot of snow for 6 hours at -38C waiting for the Moon to set so I could take pictures of star trails that I never developed because I lost the roll of film."

 

What’s in your camera bag?

"I usually carry one camera and lens, cable release, tripod bits, film, spare battery, army knife, mini screw drivers, and, of course, Lumu. I normally only take out a fixed standard lens so that I can visualise the crop of the image as I look around for images. I shoot in bursts of a few weeks or so at a time taking maybe 10-20 rolls of film with me in my bag. Then I develop and edit them in the following weeks. I try to maintain this rotation so that undeveloped films don’t build up, but there is still time between taking the photo and editing it so I am not affected by how good I thought it might have been when I took it, and how bad it actually turned out."

 

Highlight one great experience of your life.

"I find it hard to sit back and be proud of something. I just keep staring at the unfinished things, the things I couldn’t quite get right. When I’m too old or weak to drag a camera out with me, that’s when I can reflect on my life. For now, nothing is ever quite good enough for me, as my family always say."

 

Do you have any kind of obsession?

"I have an obsession with simplification. Less of everything (except food, I love food). Less cameras, less lenses, less editing, less clutter, purer mind, more room to breath and create. Yes, I am one of those people who has a place for everything, in straight lines, all perpendicular to everything else."
 

If you could give one final advice to fellow photographers, what would it be?

"Shoot film. It’s difficult sometimes but you learn so much. If you already shoot film, shoot colour, develop it yourself, move to a bigger format, make a darkroom and print your stuff. Whatever you do, just don’t make it easy for yourself, you will get bored."

 

 

Source:

lu.mu


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